Posted by on Jun 6, 2013 in Uncategorized

The Karamojong: Indigenous of Uganda at UN by Damon Corrie

The Karamojong: Indigenous of Uganda at UN by Damon Corrie

Caroline Kuno is a member of the Karamojong Tribal Nation of Uganda, and she came to New York for the 2013 Project Access Tribal Link training; held for the 12th Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII). Caroline is a representative of the Women’s Environmental Conservation Project (WECOP), which formed in 2001 as a non-governmental indigenous women’s organisation – aimed at improving the plight of the indigenous People’s of Uganda through education on HIV, domestic violence, and sustainable living. Caroline’s role at WECOP focuses on conserving and promoting the practice of indigenous traditional knowledge, training on human rights, issues; and self-sustaining projects for her community. Unfortunately, Caroline’s people – the Karamojong – are the most marginalised tribe in Uganda; and even other indigenous tribes often look down upon them as being less ‘developed’. The National Illiteracy rate in Uganda is 33%, but 88% of Karamojong people are illiterate…and a full 90% live below the National Poverty line of a mere US$1 per day. The Karomojong...

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Posted by on Jun 6, 2013 in Uncategorized

The Nauha-Otomi (Azteca-Mexica) are Deserving because of Sacrifice

The Nauha-Otomi (Azteca-Mexica) are Deserving because of Sacrifice

ONE WHO IS DESERVING BECAUSE OF THE SACRIFICE Berenice Sanchez is the Food Sovereignty Programme Co-Ordinator for Mexico, of the International Indian Treaty Council (IITC). I met her for the first time in New York in May 2013, where we found ourselves together for the Project Access Tribal Link training for the 12th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. Berenice carries a precious gift encoded in her DNA that few will ever see, I was fortunate to be one of those who has….and I shall never forget it. To encapsulate her proud lineage: The Azteca became known as the Mexica, then the Mexica became known as the Nahua-Otomi….the speakers of the Nahuatl language of the once mighty Aztec Empire of central Mexico. The meaning of the name of her proud Tribal Nation in English is “Those who are deserving because of the sacrifice”….for it was the Nahua-Otomi people who supplied the fierce warriors of the Aztec Imperial Army. Their Creator God Quetzalcoatl (Feathered serpent) told...

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Posted by on Nov 30, 2012 in Uncategorized

Sioux Tribes Purchase Pe’Sla!

Sioux Tribes Purchase Pe’Sla!

The unthinkable has happened! The world has shown its support and the Oceti Sakowin (Great Sioux Nation) has provided a powerful new narrative for Indigenous people. Indigenous is not a human construct as is “race.” Indigenous is a respect relationship between families, nations and life’s creatures, land, sacred sites, water, with each other, and with the holy powers of the Universe. Indigenous is not anthropocentric, but biocentric. Mitakuye Oyasin -We Are All Related. Even western science has reached this conclusion, finally. Pe’Sla is secured. Our ancestors are watching us, expecting us to fulfill our roles and reach our potential. The Pe’Sla effort was driven and shared by many throughout the world, including Dr. Sara Jumping Eagle, Dana Lone Hill, Ruth Hopkins and all who donated time, energy, money and artwork for perks in the first campaign. There are simply too many people in too many capacities to thank. What a whirlwind when we activate. LRI wants to extend its gratitude to the bands of the Oceti Sakowin (Great Sioux...

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Posted by on Nov 23, 2012 in Uncategorized

The Real Criminals

By : Trace A. DeMeyer We must understand history to see where we’ve been and where we are today to face the future. The effects on STOLEN GENERATIONS are still being felt in 2012.  In Indian Country, Native adoptees are still called Lost Birds or Split Feathers or Lost Ones.  Many adult adoptees are still lost to their families and tribal nations. A lost child will remain lost with sealed adoption records. Today’s legislators and lawmakers obviously do not know or recognize the crimes committed against Indian people that still affect us. As I discussed in my books, many children were stolen, literally abducted.  This was legal since it was done with the government’s approval, programs and funding.  Those social workers who drove to reservations and snatched children were never charged with kidnapping.  Some siblings were taken but then split up in foster care and later adoptions.  How did this serve the children?  It didn’t. Some Native mothers were pressured in hospitals to give up their newborn babies to...

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