Posted by on Apr 6, 2013 in Featured, News

Journey of the Nishiyuu -Paul Seesequasis

Journey of the Nishiyuu -Paul Seesequasis

68 days and 1,600 kilometers after leaving Whapmagoostui in northern James Bay, the original seven Nishiyuu Walkers arrived in Ottawa. They were greeted by thousands and joined by nearly 270 other walkers, mostly youth, from Native and non-Native communities along the way. Their simple message of healing and unity struck a chord that played well on social media and spread quickly. It was a testament to the power of the new moccasin telegraph, Twitter and Facebook, but it also revealed how completely out of touch mainstream media is with Indigenous issues. There was scant coverage, certainly Cree Radio CBC and then Radio Canada (French) were there almost from the beginning. But for weeks, and during the most arduous part of the journey, when temperatures dipped to -50 celsius, and through blowing snow and across open terrain, there was not a whisper from mainstream media. It was not for lack of being informed. Press releases were sent out. Numerous followers send links to outlets such as The Globe and Mail,...

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Posted by on Mar 14, 2013 in Featured, News

IdleNoMore. Writing. Prophecy. Making Our Way. -Paul Seesequasis (Author)

IdleNoMore. Writing. Prophecy. Making Our Way. -Paul Seesequasis (Author)

By Paul Seesequasis “For the storyteller, for the arrowmaker, language does indeed represent the only chance for survival.” – N. Scott Momaday Standing by the fire on Victoria Island, on what is day 18 of a protest fast by Chief Theresa Spence, I am thinking about our stories. Indigenous stories. Indigenous writers. “Things happen when they’re supposed to,” my mooshom used to say and there is much to adhere to in that. Idle No More is happening because it is meant to. The resurgence of Indigenous writers, storytellers, and poets is happening because it also is meant to. Contrary to doomsayers — none of them, by the way, Mayan — December 21, 2012 was never the end of the world. It does, however, signify a new dawn, a new beginning, a new time. Today there are more Indigenous writers and publishers in Canada than ever before. There are active writers collectives in Vancouver, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, and Toronto, and smaller groups in other cities. This is not coincidental. In the...

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