Posted by on Jun 4, 2013 in Featured, News

Letter to the Mitchell Daily Republic in Response to “State Wrongly Demonized in ICWA Debate” Editorial, By Natalie Stites

Letter to the Mitchell Daily Republic in Response to “State Wrongly Demonized in ICWA Debate” Editorial, By Natalie Stites

Reply to article available at: http://www.mitchellrepublic.com/event/article/id/80091/ June 3, 2013 Dear Mitchell Daily Republic Editorial Board, Your editorial is absurdly insensitive, and yes, racist against Native Americans living in the state of South Dakota. The State is not being demonized, the Indian children suffering institutional racism, poverty, abuse and neglect from their loved ones and the failure of legal systems to protect them are the ones being demonized. I covered the ICWA event for the Lakota Country Times, and I also have worked on such issues in my professional life.  I have also been published on the website, Last Real Indians, for my thoughts on ICWA and the protection and care of American Indian children. The facts are that the system of social services for all of South Dakota’s children does not work for their safety or well-being. If one of your editors had even attended the ICWA Summit, they may have learned the fact that safety is simply NOT ENOUGH to care for and ensure a child’s well-being. The...

Read More

Posted by on Dec 31, 2011 in Uncategorized

Taking Our Children Back

By : Natalie Stites Recently, there has been media coverage of the State of South Dakota taking Native American children out of their homes. This breaks up families already facing atrocious social conditions. However, the initial National Public Radio series and subsequent coverage do not anchor their story, first and foremost, in the experiences of the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota children. Instead, elaborate federal funding schema, sinister state social workers, and victimized Indian adults are used to paint a familiar story about the Indigenous in South Dakota, as well as the nine reservations that pre-date the State. While the media replays the same ol’ stereotypes, many children are crying out in the homelands for safety, and love. Further complicating the story of our children in crisis is confidentiality, which rightfully prevents social service agencies from mounting a public defense of decisions they’ve made in individual cases. Thus, only a bit of the overall story emerges through the media lens gazing upon the lives of Indigenous children in South Dakota....

Read More