Posted by on Sep 3, 2015 in Featured

Obama’s Trip to Alaska to Highlight Climate Change Prompts West Coast Demonstrations

Obama’s Trip to Alaska to Highlight Climate Change Prompts West Coast Demonstrations

On August 31st, President Obama traveled to Alaska in effort to high light the impacts of climate change.  In response, Alaskan Native villages and other Indigenous communities from Alaska to the coasts of Washington and Oregon held demonstrations to highlight the Presidents dismal environmental record including his most recent decision to allow Shell oil to drill in the Arctic Ocean. Solidarity actions were held in Anchorage, Seattle and Portland against Obama’s recent decision to allow Shell Oil to resume drilling in the Arctic Ocean, stating his trip to talk about climate change while allowing for Arctic drilling amounted to hypocrisy. Indigenous land defenders also pointed out other Obama administration anti-environmental decisions such as; exempting fracking from many environmental regulations on both public and private lands, over seeing the largest increase in oil and natural gas drilling in recent history and the recent decision to allow for off shore drilling off of the Atlantic coast and in the Arctic Ocean. “If he wants to talk climate change then he should...

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Posted by on Sep 2, 2015 in Featured

Grand Ronde Tribal Court Upholds Mass Disenrollment

Grand Ronde Tribal Court Upholds Mass Disenrollment

Judge relies on ancestor Treaty Chief’s execution by U.S. Army before reaching the Reservation to terminate 86 Indians; 7 deceased September 1, 2015 GRAND RONDE, OR – The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon Tribal Court has upheld the disenrollment of 86 Grand Ronde Indians. The terminated members each descend from Chief Tumulth, signatory of the Treaty forming the Tribe. In the Tribal Court’s decision, Judge David Shaw, a private practitioner in Portland, relied on what he called a “pseudo-residency element” and Chief Tumulth’s “lack of relocation to the CTGR area.” Chief Tumulth did not “relocate” from the Tumulth family’s traditional home at the Cascade locks to the Tribe’s reservation because he was executed by the U.S. Army in April 1856. Nothing in the Tribe’s Constitution requires a “pseudo-residency element” nor does it call for “relocation.” In fact, as the Court admitted, the Tribe has long claimed Tumulth as its founding Treaty Chief to advance its governmental interests in off-reservation lands along the Columbia River. “At...

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Posted by on Sep 2, 2015 in Featured, News

CHIPPEWA EXERCISE TREATY RIGHTS AT HOLE IN THE DAY LAKE FOUR MEMBERS CITED BY DEPT NATURAL RESOURCES AND WILD RICE SEIZED

CHIPPEWA EXERCISE TREATY RIGHTS AT HOLE IN THE DAY LAKE FOUR MEMBERS CITED BY DEPT NATURAL RESOURCES AND WILD RICE SEIZED

Gull Lake, MN — What began as an exercise of treaty rights to harvest wild rice resulted in a two-day gathering and four DNR [Department of Natural Resources] seizure citations for various Chippewa band members. On the morning of the first day DNR issued the 1855 Treaty Authority a one-day permit to harvest wild rice without a state license. Steve “Punky” Clark, Vice Chair of the 1855 TA said “we don’t need permission from DNR to exercise our treaty rights to gather food, the Creator gave us the gift of manoomin long ago.” Clark was referring to Chippewa creation stones that tell us how the Creator guided us to where the food grows on the water. “The people made an important step towards the State of Minnesota recognizing and understanding our rights to gather food all year round” said Archie LaRose, Chairman of the 1855 TA, adding “but we need to protect all the ricers throughout the season and across-the 1855 ceded-territory.’ In an effort to track and assist...

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Posted by on Aug 30, 2015 in Featured

Seattle Human Rights Commission Endorses Resolution Recognizing the Trauma of the American Indian Boarding School Era

Seattle Human Rights Commission Endorses Resolution Recognizing the Trauma of the American Indian Boarding School Era

On August 6th, the Seattle Human Rights Commission voted unanimously to support a proposed resolution to the Seattle city council that would recognize the trauma and historical impacts of the American Indian boarding school era.  The resolution was presented by Matt Remle, one of the resolutions authors. The resolution grew out of a planning committee for Seattle’s now annual Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebration, held on the second Monday in October.  Section 5 of last years Seattle’s Indigenous Peoples’ Day resolution states: “The City of Seattle firmly commits to continue its efforts to promote the well-being and growth of Seattle’s American Indian and Indigenous community” The aim of the resolution is to help raise awareness to the American Indian Boarding School policy and the legacy of historical trauma left in its wake; support efforts towards healing for survivors and their families; encourage the Seattle Public Schools to both teach about the American Indian Boarding School policy and to bring Native American languages into its classrooms (which were lost largely due too...

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Posted by on Aug 30, 2015 in Featured

Tribal Disenrollment, Donald Trump, and the Anti-Birthright Citizenship Movement by Gabriel S. Galanda

Tribal Disenrollment, Donald Trump, and the Anti-Birthright Citizenship Movement by Gabriel S. Galanda

The Citizenship Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution states that: “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” In other words, if you are born in America, you are a citizen; American citizenship is a birthright. What’s more, American citizenship can only be divested voluntarily. 8 U.S.C. § 1481. It cannot be undone by Congress. As the U.S. Supreme Court has made clear: “The fourteenth amendment . . . has conferred no authority upon congress to restrict the effect of birth, declared by the constitution to constitute a sufficient and complete right to citizenship. United States v. Wong Kim Ark, 169 U.S. 649, 703 (1898).” Like American birthright citizenship, American indigenous belonging, or citizenship, is also a birthright for many if not most American indigenous peoples. Article 9 of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples provides that indigenous persons enjoy an inherent “right...

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