Posted by on May 26, 2016 in Featured

Quinault Indian Nation fights to protect Grays Harbor from Proposed Crude Oil Terminal*

Quinault Indian Nation fights to protect Grays Harbor from Proposed Crude Oil Terminal*

“Tribal and commercial fisheries, tourism and the best razor clams anywhere are among the many ways Grays Harbor, our rivers and coastline set the table for local food, jobs and our economy. There’s nothing more important to our future prosperity and way of life than keeping our waterways healthy, productive, and safe from crude oil.” -Tyson Johnston, QIN Vice-President No crude oil currently moves through the Quinault Indian Reservation or Grays Harbor, but in the coming months this could change, as state and local leaders will decide whether to permit expanded facilities at the Port of Grays Harbor that will allow crude oil to move through our region. The good news is that plans for two other proposed terminals are in question. U.S. Development Group has terminated its Port of Grays Harbor lease option. Renewable Energy Group (REG) has stated it will not pursue crude oil shipments in and out of its expanded terminal, but the Nation is monitoring the status of the original proposal to limit REG’s activities....

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Posted by on May 25, 2016 in Featured

Native American Students Demand Accountability from Western Washington University by Michaela Vendiola & Tahlia Natachu

Native American Students Demand Accountability from Western Washington University by Michaela Vendiola & Tahlia Natachu

On May 23, 2016, Native students from Western Washington University’s Native American Student Union met with the colleges administration to address the college’s failure to both support Native students and its lack of engagement with local tribes. Students issued a set of demands that included: implementation of a tribal liaison, the building of a traditional Coast Salish Long House on campus, Government-to-Government Training between WWU government and the local Tribal Governments, and more. Below is the students letter to administration. Dear, President Bruce Shepard incoming President, Dr. Sabah Randhawa, and Western Washington University’s Board of Trustees, CC: Paul Dunn, Kunle Ojikutu, Brent Carbajal, Stephanie Bowers, Eileen Coughlin, Richard Van Den Hul, Steve Swan, Becca Kenna-Schenk, Paul Cocke, Brian Sullivan, Darin Rasmussen, Rick Benner, John Furman, Linda Teater, Ted Pratt, Renee Collins, Michael Sledge, Eric Alexander, Linda Beckman, Tim Szymanowski, Manca Valum, Steven Vanderstaay, Sue Guenter-Schlesinger, Vicki Hamblin, Craig Dunn, Jack Herring, Kit Spicer, Steve Hollenhorst, LeaAnn Martin, Catherine Clark, Francisco Rios, Mark Greenberg We, the Native American Student Union...

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Posted by on May 24, 2016 in Featured

IHANKTONWAN/YANKTON SIOUX ASSERT SOVEREIGNTY AGAINST ARMY CORPS AND LAY GROUNDWORK FOR TRUE MEANINGFUL CONSULTATION IN CONTENTIOUS DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE REVIEW

IHANKTONWAN/YANKTON SIOUX ASSERT SOVEREIGNTY AGAINST ARMY CORPS AND LAY GROUNDWORK FOR TRUE MEANINGFUL CONSULTATION IN CONTENTIOUS DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE REVIEW

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, May 23, 2016 YANKTON SIOUX CONTACT: Thomasina Real Bird, Yankton Sioux Tribe (303) 673-9600 or Jason Cooke, Yankton Sioux Tribe (605) 384 3641 Faith Spotted Eagle, Ihanktonwan Treaty Chair 605 481 0416 Construction crews have begun the tearing of earth near the Sacred Rock Spirit Camp, near Cannonball on the Standing Rock Reservation. Photo Credit: Joye Braun Construction crews have begun the tearing of earth near the Sacred Rock Spirit Camp, near Cannonball on the Standing Rock Reservation. Photo Credit: Joye Braun A long awaited meeting between the Yankton Sioux Tribe and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (“Corps”) took place at the Tribe’s Ft. Randall Casino on Wednesday, May 18, 2016. The Yankton adamantly oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline (“DAPL”), and further resent the appropriation of the name “Dakota,” which means “the people” in the Dakota language, by DAPL officials. Though it was initially termed “consultation” in the Tribe’s invitation, the Tribe chose to change the event to a pre-consultation meeting when it received...

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Posted by on May 21, 2016 in Featured

“Modern Day Warriors” Fight to Protect Their Homelands by Zaysha Grinnell

“Modern Day Warriors” Fight to Protect Their Homelands by Zaysha Grinnell

My name is Zaysha Grinnell. I am 15 years old and I am a member of the Three Affiliated Tribes which is located on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation here in North Dakota. I have lived on the reservation all of my life. Ever since I was a little girl, I always saw the beauty in it. Which is why I am choosing to put up a fight to stop two pipelines that will be crossing through our lake. I had put together a youth group called the “Modern Day Warriors” within the last three weeks to help me bring more awareness to the pipelines. On April 26th 2016, I brought attention to these pipelines by creating a online petition on Change.org which currently has 802 supporters. Our lake here is named Lake Sacagawea, after the legendary woman herself. The two pipelines proposed to go through the only home I ever knew are; Dakota Access Pipeline and Lake Sakakawea Pipeline. Dakota Access will not only be going through my...

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Posted by on May 19, 2016 in Featured

Global Actions Taken to Break Free from Fossil Fuels

Global Actions Taken to Break Free from Fossil Fuels

From May 3rd-15th, tens of thousands of people took action on six continents to demand that we break free from fossil fuels. From Brazil, Germany, Australia, to the Philippines and Nigeria people took to the streets and waters, engaged in direct actions, and demanded that we keep fossil fuels in ground and for a just transition to renewable energy. Across the globe the impacts of climate change are being felt. This past January, for the first time ever, the Department of Housing and Urban Development allocated $48 million to relocate the Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi Chitimacha Choctaw and the Lowlander Center in Louisiana due to the impacts of climate change.  Earning them the distinction as being the first climate refugees in North America. Indigenous peoples, whom represent the communities most impacted by climate change and whom have long led the efforts to combat the impacts of colonialism and environmental degradation, played central roles in the mass actions. Here’s highlights from a few of the actions. “This...

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