Posted by on Feb 23, 2017 in Featured

This isn’t over: take up the torch and defund DAPL! by Jacqueline Fielder

This isn’t over: take up the torch and defund DAPL! by Jacqueline Fielder

Today, for the umpteenth time in the history of Plains Indians-U.S. relations, the United States government is using its military might to evict indigenous people from their land so that settlers can extract a profitable resource from the earth. To some non-indigenous people looking into this moment from the outside, this may seem an abstract exaggeration. No one has died, they might say. There are legal dimensions to the issue. But this is no exaggeration. Today, on February 22, 2017, the United States is repeating history, and unless we get ourselves, our cities, our states, our pension funds, and our universities to divest from banks financing the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and Keystone XL Pipeline (KXL), we all have oil on our hands. In 1851, the U.S. government subjected Lakota and Dakota bands to the Fort Laramie Treaty. This treaty outlined the boundaries of “The Great Sioux Nation.” When settlers discovered gold within the bounds of the Great Sioux Nation, the United States government used its military might to...

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Posted by on Feb 23, 2017 in Featured

HOOPA VALLEY TRIBE APPLUADS APPEALS COURT’S DECEISON TO UPHOLD LIFE-SAVING WATER RELEASES FOR HOOPA FISH

HOOPA VALLEY TRIBE APPLUADS APPEALS COURT’S DECEISON TO UPHOLD LIFE-SAVING WATER RELEASES FOR HOOPA FISH

February 21, 2017 – Today, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld water releases to the Trinity River to prevent salmon die-off downstream. Since the horrific 2002 salmon kill on the Lower Klamath River, the Bureau of Reclamation has released supplemental water from the Trinity River Reservoir on numerous occasions to prevent similar fish kill. Reversing the Eastern District Court’s judgment, the appeals court ruled that federal and state laws authorized the Bureau of Reclamation release water from its reservoirs to protect migrating fish in the Lower Klamath River, downstream of the Trinity River confluence. The Bureau’s over diversion of water from the Klamath River in Oregon had killed as many as 70,000 adult salmon in 2002. Six times since then, the Bureau of Reclamation, at the request of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, has released extra water from the Trinity Project to augment flow in the Lower Klamath and avert repetition of the fish epizootic. “Once again, the Court of Appeals has acted to uphold our property rights in...

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Posted by on Feb 21, 2017 in Featured

Saving Licton Springs by Matt Remle

Saving Licton Springs by Matt Remle

Nestled away in a North Seattle residential and commercial district lays the remnants of one of the last remaining sacred sites of the Duwamish peoples, Licton Springs. Licton (pronounced LEE’kteed) is derived from the Duwamish word le?qtid meaning red-paint, a connotation of the reddish colored mud from the springs. The springs served as a location for spiritual gatherings for the Duwamish peoples, where they would gather annually to build sweat-lodges for cleansing. The red ochre pigment was also collected from the springs and used as a paint for different ceremonies and to decorate longhouses and other items with spiritual imagery. The reddish-mud was also utilized as an ointment by traditional healers. “For generations, the Duwamish Tribe gathered at Licton Springs, together with their relatives by marriage, in the proper season for harvesting sacred Red Ochre pigment, necessary for spiritual celebration and renewal. Like the Duwamish Tribe, neighboring First Nations consider the sacred site le?qtid to be a tangible cultural property inherited from their male or female Duwamish Ancestors. As...

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Posted by on Feb 18, 2017 in Featured

Defund DAPL National Conference Call Set: Learn how to run a Divestment Campaign

Defund DAPL National Conference Call Set: Learn how to run a Divestment Campaign

2/17/2017 – A National conference call has been set for February 21 where people can call in and hear from the organizers of Seattle’s successful campaign to divest over $3 billion from Wells Fargo due to its financial backing of the Dakota Access pipeline. Seattle’s success has brought a tidal wave of energy from other cities, towns and Tribes looking to conduct similar campaigns. As Energy Transfer moves towards completion of the pipeline, now is the time to increase efforts to divest from banks affiliated with Energy Transfer Partners and the Dakota Access pipeline What: National conference call to learn how to run divestment campaign When: February 21st 2017 Time: 12:30 PM Pacific Standard Time Dial in number: 319-527-2171 Hosts/speakers: Rachel Heaton, Matt Remle, Gyasi Ross, Edwin Lindo Please read Guide to Divestment that includes general information about running a divestment campaign. “When people with no easy access to money take on big money, it’s always a hard, uphill battle. The side with lots of money can afford to...

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Posted by on Feb 16, 2017 in Featured

Santa Monica City Council Moves towards Divesting from Wells Fargo

Santa Monica City Council Moves towards Divesting from Wells Fargo

On February 14th 2017, the Santa Monica city council voted 5-0 to begin the process towards divesting from Wells Fargo. The unanimous vote will, “direct staff to examine its investment practices and consider divesting all City funds from Wells Fargo, due to their business practices and their involvement in financing the Dakota Access Pipeline.” The item was placed on the agenda by Councilmembers Terry O’Day and Tony Vazquez. In an on-line petition started by Jenna Perelman, she writes, “Santa Monica has long been a leader in sustainability. To be a true leader in this field, we must embrace sustainability in all aspects of our community, including our investments. Let us take example from Seattle and Davis: divesting from banks involved with the Dakota Access Pipeline will show a strong commitment to protecting the environment, and stand as an important statement in support of the rights of indigenous peoples.” According to the Santa Monica Next, “Councilmembers Sue Himmelrich and Pam O’Connor were not present for the vote. Himmelrich recused herself...

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