Posted by on Sep 25, 2016 in Featured

Still Sacred: Why Energy Transfer Partners’ Cannonball Land Grab Doesn’t Change Anything by Gabriel Galanda

Still Sacred: Why Energy Transfer Partners’ Cannonball Land Grab Doesn’t Change Anything by Gabriel Galanda

The media was quick to report that Energy Transfer Partners, the developer of the “Dakota” Access Pipeline (DAPL), purchased the Cannonball Ranch last Thursday. What wasn’t reported was the extent to which Ranch is sacred to both Native and Non-Native society. Indeed, its sacredness spans both worlds. As the Rapid City Journal reported a decade ago: The ranch, since statehood, has been the land that bridged North Dakota to the Standing Rock Sioux Indian Reservation, on the other side of the Cannonball River. Through the eyes of non-Natives, the ranch “was the first to be inducted in the North Dakota Cowboy Hall of Fame.” The Sioux Peoples likewise believe it to be a sacred place; even according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: At the Cannonball Ranch, there are burials of notable Standing Rock memebers [sic] and their families including Maltida Galpin, Alma Parken, Louisa Degray Van Solen, and Charles Picotte, among whom are signatories on the Treaty of Fort Laramie. There is also an unmarked grave of...

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Posted by on Sep 20, 2016 in Featured

Tulalip Tribes Man Choked to Death by Police: Family Responds

Tulalip Tribes Man Choked to Death by Police: Family Responds

“He yelled “I can’t breath.” But the officers continued to choke him, until he died. And when he stopped breathing, the officers thought he was “faking it.” On September 18th, 2015, Cecil D. Lacy Jr (Tulalip Tribes) died while in police custody. The incident happened around 10 p.m. on the Tulalip Tribes reservation, located 1-hour north of Seattle, WA, when two Tulalip Tribal Police officers and a Snohomish Country Sheriff’s deputy responded to a report of a man walking in the road. During an unwarranted altercation between the police and Lacy, Lacy became unresponsive and died. Police used an electronic stun gun on Lacy and placed him in a choke hold. September 19th, 2016 statement by the Lacy family. “We with the Lacy family remain deeply saddened that our loved one’s life was interrupted late one night last September for seemingly no reason. We are also worried about other vulnerable tribal citizens and community members, who are not provided adequate mental health care and who are forced to interact...

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Posted by on Sep 6, 2016 in Featured

Tangled Web of Lies: U.S. Army Corps’ DAPL Historic Properties “Review” by Gabe Galanda

Tangled Web of Lies: U.S. Army Corps’ DAPL Historic Properties “Review” by Gabe Galanda

“Oh, what a tangled web we weave! When we first practice to deceive.” –Sir Walter Scott The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ “review” of historic properties in ancestral Sioux Treaty lands, associated with the “Dakota” Access Pipeline (DAPL) project, is fundamentally dishonest—especially considering the easement the Corps must still issue to allow drilling underneath Lake Oahe and the Missouri River pursuant to the federal Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899. In fact, the Corps have woven together a tangled web of lies, and are telling those lies to the Great Sioux Peoples and the entire country. Under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the Corps must take into account the effects of its undertaking—here, the Corps’ “grant [of] an easement for the DAPL project to be placed under Lake Oahe”—on historic and cultural properties, including Sioux sacred sites. Lake Oahe sits at the confluence of the Cannonball River into the Missouri River, and constitutes reserved Sioux Treaty territory; in fact, the eastern boundary of Ft. Laramie Treaty...

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Posted by on Jul 18, 2016 in Featured

Nooksack General Council Convenes Emergency Meeting; Elects Four Interim Councilpersons

Nooksack General Council Convenes Emergency Meeting; Elects Four Interim Councilpersons

(Deming, WA) – On Thursday night (July 14th), the Nooksack General Council convened an emergency meeting that resulted in the election of four interim Tribal Councilpersons and the unanimous passage of a Resolution that invoked the body’s inherent, reserved authority given the breakdown in Nooksack constitutional government. Because the holdover Tribal Council refused to convene an election for four Tribal Council seats that was constitutionally required by March 19, 2016, and overthrew the Court before the election was about to be judicially compelled, the General Council convened the meeting and held its own election. Four non-Nooksack 306 members were elected to office: Robert Doucette, Vice Chairman, Bernie Roberts, Treasurer, Ron Roberts, Councilperson, and Jeremiah Johnny, Councilperson. Doucette served on the Tribe’s first Tribal Council after its recognition in 1973, and Bernie Roberts also previously served on the Tribal Council. The new Councilpersons will soon be sworn in before the remaining four Councilpersons: Bob Kelly, Chairman, Nadene Zapata, Secretary, Carmen Tageant, Councilperson (whose recall from office by the holdover Tribal...

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Posted by on Jun 20, 2016 in Featured

Supreme Court Affirms Tribal Court Jurisdiction Over Dollar General Corporation

Supreme Court Affirms Tribal Court Jurisdiction Over Dollar General Corporation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 23, 2016 Contact: Princella RedCorn press@niwrc.org or (402) 417-4174 Supreme Court Affirms Tribal Court Jurisdiction Over Dollar General Corporation Decision upholds tribal civil jurisdiction over non-Indians who sexually assault Native children on tribal lands (Lame Deer, MT) The U.S. Supreme Court today affirmed the Fifth Circuit’s ruling that the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians’ (“Mississippi Choctaw”) Tribal Court possesses jurisdiction over a lawsuit brought by Mississippi Choctaw citizens against the Dollar General Corporation for an alleged sexual assault committed by the store’s manager at a Dollar General store located on the Mississippi Choctaw Reservation. The Court deadlocked at 4 to 4, with no majority of Justices agreeing on a final outcome, so the decision of the Fifth Circuit stands. The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (“NIWRC”), a leading advocate against domestic violence in Indian Country, participated in the Supreme Court case as amicus curiae and filed a brief to preserve the inherent sovereign authority of American Indian Nations to protect their women and children living...

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