Posted by on Jun 22, 2015 in Featured

No Dependence But The Bow By: Dawi Huhamaza

No Dependence But The Bow By: Dawi Huhamaza

I will tell you a story of the first documented indigenous man murdered by a european. Our native friend was five foot four inches tall (quite old for his time), had brown eyes, and was lactose intolerant- like many of us Aboriginal North Americans. He bore on his back a cape of woven grasses. Around his waist a loincloth of buckskin, and leather leggings to accompany them. On his torso- a striped vest of stitched skins, and upon his crown a cap of bear fur sewn from strips. He was carrying with him the most important possessions a man would own; a flint dagger on an ash handle bound with sinews, a fire-making kit with iron pyrite as a striker for another chunk of flint, tinder fungus to create a coal, a copper headed axe, (a symbol of his status and trade as a copper-smith, a highly specialized skill at his time,) a flint-knapping kit, a quiver full of unfinished arrows, and a bow made of yew wood that...

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Posted by on Nov 20, 2012 in Uncategorized

Zíċataŋka Aŋpétu (Turkey Day)

By : Dawi Huhamaza It’s Native American Heritage month. Yippie! Huzzah! Hoka! We have a month all to ourselves where we can display our culture and be proud. In 1990, George Bush Sr. (his administration and himself, of course) designated November as “National American Indian Heritage Month,” but it seems to me only recently have I become aware of it. I don’t remember ever hearing about it growing up in school. But wait a second, why November? November ‘tis the season to misappropriate and indoctrinate people in the legend and myth of the original inhabitants of North America (Turtle Island/Ḳéya Wíta). No-Scalp-November is when young people all across the United States get their “Indian” education, aside from the typical Bering Strait theory-accepted-as-fact bullcrap. Kindergarteners across the nation will be donning their multi-colored construction paper headdresses and brown paper sack buckskin (such indignities I faced at that age in Tennessee), with their faces painted with simple lines of various colors, and learn to war whoop and speak in broken english....

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Posted by on Sep 12, 2012 in Uncategorized

Oċéti mitáwa kiŋ hená bdewákaŋtuŋwaŋ ewíċakiyapi do

By : Dawi Huhamaza My campfire is called the dwellers of the sacred lake. These are the words I was taught to say, when telling people the name of my band in the Oċéti Śakówiŋ (Dak̇óta Nation). This says a lot about who I could be, where I might be from, and who my ancestors are. I know my heritage 7+ generations back on the Dak̇óta side, and I am descended from the pairings of Andrew Myrick and Wiŋyaŋ Ġi Wiŋ, as well as Snána and Wakíŋyaŋ Waśté. Of course I have many other ancestors, but these two families I feel play a major part in our history as a people, and show critical perspectives of the events surrounding the Dak̇óta-US War of 1862. It has been known in my family that Andrew Myrick and Wiŋyaŋ Ġi Wiŋ, named in English as Nancy, were our progenitors. The story of Andrew’s famous words in regard to the Dak̇óta’s plight of starvation have been repeated so many times in history books,...

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